MOREHOUSE STUDENT FOLLOWS HIS PASSION, FINDS THE BLACK PRESS

Aug 7, 2017 | The Louisiana Weekly 2017, Tiana Hunt | 0 comments


Tiana Hunt (NNPA/DTU Journalism Fellow, The Louisiana Weekly)

Darrell Williams is a rising senior at Morehouse College, who has big dreams of being a creative director, one day.

Williams, 24, is currently a student scholar with the National Newspaper Publishers Association’s “Discover The Unexpected” Journalism Fellowship program.

At Morehouse, Williams is a drama major with a minor in cinematography.

Williams was born and raised in Landover, Md., and is the oldest of his siblings; his younger sister, T’Keyah, is 22 years-old and his younger brother, Rashad, is 12 years-old.

“I was the first in my family to pursue a career in business administration, but my life changed after I received mentoring,” said Williams. “I was inspired to pursue my passion in acting, dancing and creative directing.”

Williams’ didn’t take a straight and narrow path to Morehouse.

“I went to Towson University in Baltimore for one year, then I transferred to Prince George’s Community College in Largo, Md.; then I transferred to Morehouse College. I wanted to go to Morehouse, because of the brotherhood and to learn how to interact with other men in a positive manner; I wanted to join a network of successful men.”

Williams is now a man of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Incorporated and he is more determined to help others and pursue his passion.

“I pledged to Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, because I believe in the organization’s values. The mission, values and morals that the Kappa’s live by are impeccable,” said Williams. “Being a part of Kappa Alpha Psi, I learned that man must know thyself and, no matter what, you have to keep moving forward and that you can’t make any excuses.”

Williams also learned that he has to stand strong in who he is. Networking opportunities are another benefit of becoming a Kappa.

The Maryland native said that two of his biggest accomplishments, so far, have been getting a scholarship to attend Morehouse and joining Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity.

Williams said that he is optimistic about his future and appreciative of all of the opportunities that come his way.

Before the NNPA/DTU Journalism Fellowship, Williams said that he didn’t know much about the Black Press, but he looks forward to learning more. Williams is excited for his future and about the chance to enrich his journalism skills this summer at The Louisiana Weekly.

“I hope to learn all that I could possible learn about the Black Press and the NNPA, this summer,” said Williams. “I desire to become a stronger writer and storyteller. I know that I need improvements in some areas, but I am open to constructive criticism and I am eager to learn more.”

Williams continued: “I know that the NNPA fellowship can help me with my journalism skills. The opportunity to intern with The Louisiana Weekly was a needed experience. I do not take NNPA/DTU fellowship lightly.”

Tiana Hunt is a 2017 NNPA “Discover The Unexpected” Journalism Fellow and a recent graduate of Clark Atlanta University. This summer, Tiana is writing for The Louisiana Weekly, a member newspaper of the NNPA. Follow Tiana on Twitter @TianaTaughtYa.

Learn more about the “NNPA “Discover The Unexpected” Journalism Fellowship program at nnpa.org/dtu.

PHOTO: Darrell Williams dreams of being a creative director, one day. (Freddie Allen/AMG/NNPA)

Morehouse Student Darrell Williams follows his passion, finds the Black Press.

Tiana Hunt

Tiana Hunt

Fellow, The Louisiana Weekly

Tiana Hunt is a senior at Clark-Atlanta University who hails from Houston, Texas. This dynamic young journalist has studied abroad in Beijing, has experience as a news anchor, reporter and producer at CAU’s TV station and an on-air personality at the university’s radio station. She is the first in her family to go to college and determined to make her mark in television and journalism.

MOREHOUSE STUDENT FOLLOWS HIS PASSION, FINDS THE BLACK PRESS

Darrell Williams is a rising senior at Morehouse College, who has big dreams of being a creative director, one day.

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