TAKE A “STAY CATION” AT THE FIRST ZIPLINE COURSE IN ILLINOIS

Jul 8, 2016 | Briahnna Brown, Chevy DTU, Chicago Defender, McKenzie Marshall, NNPA | 0 comments

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Brianna Brown, McKenzie Marshall

Summer has officially begun and now many families are trying to decide where they can take their family for a vacation while also staying on a budget.

Beach resorts can be very costly, but why travel so far? Go Ape Treetop course is what some would categorize as a “stay-cation,” located only 30 minutes outside of Chicago in Bemis Woods, you can take the family on an adventure in the woods for two to three hours.

Yes, this might not be the vacation you had in mind, however, this can be just as much of a rewarding experience for you and the family as if you had traveled to a destination resort. You are able to explore the forest canopy, fly on zip lines between each platform, swing through the trees, and observe the peace and quiet surroundings away from the city.
The Go Ape course is also the first zip-line and treetop obstacle course in Illinois, and Chicago is Go Ape’s largest market offering the outdoor adventure.

“We’ve been looking out here to continue our mission, which is to encourage everybody to live life adventurously,” Chris Swallow, Go Ape program director, said.

Don’t worry about safety because Go Ape has that covered. Each participant is equipped with harnesses, pulleys and carabiners and receive a 30-minute safety briefing and training. After the training each participant is able to being the course with the guidance of Go Ape instructors.

When heading out to the course be sure to bring lunch. Bemis Woods has several trails you can walk along and camp grounds for you to have an old-fashion picnic.

This experience is a good way to bond as family: each course is tougher than the first which enables you to build communication skills while having fun. These adventures are also ways to get people out of their comfort zone and get the adrenaline going.
For only $57 per adult participant, and $37 for participants ages 10 to 15, this is a fun and affordable way to get the family to live adventurously while treading lightly.

“Go Ape is quickly becoming nationally known for fun, challenge and adventure, as well as environmental stewardship,” Dan D’Agostino, Go Ape managing director, said in a statement. “We’re looking forward to getting residents and visitors up in the trees, as well as becoming part of the region’s vibrant outdoors culture.”

For more information about Go Ape Zipline and Treetop course visit their website at https://goape.com/courses

Briahnna Brown

Briahnna Brown

Fellow, Chicago Defender

Briahnna Brown is a recent graduate from the School of Communications at Howard University. Briahnna was born and raised in Baltimore, Md., and many of her stories have focused on issues that affect her hometown. Briahnna’s articles have appeared in the Howard University News Service and the NNPA News Wire. Last year, Briahnna was selected to be an American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) intern and she worked at the Smithsonian Magazine in Washington, D.C. Briahnna has also interned at Howard Magazine, the university’s alumni publication.

McKenzie Marshall

McKenzie Marshall

Fellow, Chicago Defender

McKenzie T. Marshall is a senior journalism major with a concentration in broadcasting at Howard University. McKenzie is a contributing writer for “The Hilltop,” and a member of Howard’s chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists. She also interned at the Washington, D.C., bureau of the BBC in the spring of 2016. McKenzie’s ultimate career goal is to be an on-air news reporter. One day, she wants to host her own television show focusing on politics and foreign news.

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